Blog: On The Level

Camp Code

At the Level Playing Field Institute, we believe that our students of color should be equipped with the exposure, skills and mentors to become the producers of technology rather than just the consumers. We also believe deeply in the role of parents, siblings and communities in validating, encouraging, and honoring the hard work of their student. This is why LPFI is so excited to partner with the YMCA, the nation’s community organization, for a second year to pilot a computer science program called Camp Code.

Diversity Data Shows Need to Focus on Women of Color

The floodgates holding back the tech industry's dismal diversity data are now wide open. First Google, then LinkedIn and Yahoo, and now Facebook have soaked Silicon Valley watchers with what many of us already assumed: the tech community is mostly white and male. The statistics about racial and gender diversity in the technology field are disheartening and signal the need for efforts to increase the presence of women and African American, Latino, and Native American professionals in computing and technology fields.

LPFI Initiative for Equity in AP Computer Science

This week, as students across the country took the 2014 Advanced Placement (AP) Computer Science exam, it is timely to reflect on the severe disparities in the numbers of African-American and Latino students participating in AP computer science courses and taking the AP computer science exam in California (and throughout the nation).

Mark your Calendars for June 14th to Celebrate with LPFI

Greetings LPFI supporters! I am excited to reconnect with you and to officially announce the kick-off of the 10th Anniversary of SMASH!

The Hackathon Village

"It takes a village to raise a child." - African proverb

“…also to put on a youth hackathon” – Level Playing Field Institute

Community Impact Hackathons Need to Stay in the Community

Guest blog post by Jen Arguello of the Kapor Center for Social Impact.

At the Kapor Center for Social Impact, we are always looking toward creative ways to channel technology to create positive social impact. One of the most exciting ways we do this is by empowering youth –particularly underrepresented youth of color– to be more than just consumers of technology, but producers of it as well.

Join this SMASH parent in supporting LPFI's 10 Cubed Campaign to celebrate the 10th Anniversary of SMASH!

LPFI recently chatted with one of our supporters who also happens to be the mother of a SMASH alumni. We were so inpsired by her generous spirit that we thought we'd learn a little more about her and why she chooses to support SMASH.

SMASH Scholar Shares How She Got Early Admission to an Elite University

Interview with Samantha Burnell, SMASH Senior Scholar at Stanford

In this post Samantha "Sammie" Burnell shares her college application experience and how she gained early admission to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Early admission is a college admission plan in which students apply earlier in the year than usual and receive their results early as well. This benefits students by reducing the number of applications to be completed at one time and by providing results early. Most colleges that participate in early admission request applications by October 15th or November 1st and return results by December 15th. There are two types of early admissions: Early Action, which is not binding, and Early Decision, which is binding. (wikipedia)

Sammie at SMASH Stanford
Sammie (pictured left) with fellow SMASH scholars at 2013 Recognition and Exhibition event at Stanford

Level Playing Field Institute Ramping Up for a New Year

This post is authored by LPFI's Executive Director Jarvis Sulcer, Ph.D.

2014 is going to be a big year for the Level Playing Field Institute. I hope you will come along for the ride!

Last year, we began laying the foundation to position LPFI as the leading organization working to improve access and opportunity for underrepresented students of color in STEM. Our main goal for 2014 is to find new ways to fill in the opportunity gaps through our middle and high school intervention programs and assess the efficacy of our efforts through our in-house research studies.